Posts Authored by Zachary D. Eddy

EDP Renewables secures two PPAs for Timber Road IV project

EDP Renewables North America LLC (EDPR) has secured “two 15-year power purchase agreements (PPAs) with an undisclosed commercial and industrial entity to sell the energy produced from its 125 MW Timber Road IV wind project,” nawindpower.com reports. Timber Road IV is expected to begin operations in 2019. For more, read the full article

Renewable Energy, State Updates

Ohio manufacturing could be revolution starting-point in advance energy technologies

Two analytical policy groups focused on “the impact of changing energy technologies on national defense” say Ohio’s manufacturing heritage “could be the starting point of a revolution in advanced-energy technologies,” Cleveland.com reports. CNA, a non-profit research and analysis organization “with roots in national defense analytical work,” and the Atlantic Council, “a think tank created in the early 1960s” in support of NATO, said the United States must embrace advanced-energy technologies or “the nation’s competitive manufacturing abilities and its military superiority will erode,” according to the article. David Livingston, the Atlantic Council’s deputy director for climate and advanced energy, said places like Cleveland that have a rich manufacturing heritage “have a role to play in the United States either being a leader or a laggard.” For more, read the full article.

Renewable Energy, State Updates

Cincinnati named to top 25 most environmentally friendly U.S. cities

Insider included Cincinnati in its top-25 ranking of the most “eco-conscious destinations across the country,” Soapbox Cincinnati reports. Insider consulted sources including Siemens’ Green City Index and WalletHub’s 2017 list of America’s greenest cities that “compares 100 of the largest cities in the US across 22 ‘green’ indicators like median air-quality and number of jobs accessible by public transit.” Insider reports that in 2012, Cincinnati “became the largest US city to offer its residents 100% renewable electricity.” For more, read the full article or click here for the full list of cities.

Environmental, Renewable Energy

Harrison County power plant will bring jobs, tax revenue

The Ohio Power Siting Board recently authorized construction of the 1,050-megawatt, natural gas-fired Harrison Power Plant in Cadiz, according to an article in the TimesReporter.com. Nick Homrighausen, executive director of community & economic development for Harrison County, said the board’s approval was “great news,” calling the power plant “a once-in-a-generation chance to use it to grow,” according to the article. Homrighausen estimates the plant’s construction will bring 500 to 700 construction jobs to the area over a three-year period, in addition to the 25 to 30 high-paying jobs once the plant is operational. Additionally, the plant will “boost income tax collections for the village of Cadiz” and help diversify the local economy. For more, read the full article.

Economic Development

Champaign County wind farm project granted extension

The Ohio Power Siting Board (OPSB) recently granted an extension to “two phases of a proposed wind farm in Champaign County,” giving the developers until May 2019 to begin construction, the Journal-News reports. The OPSB sided with the developer, Everpower Wind Holdings, “who argued the extensions were needed because years of litigation by opponents had delayed the project,” according to the article. The board’s decision extends the certificate for two proposed phases of the project, Buckeye Wind and Champaign Wind, which would install about 50 wind turbines across sections of the county. The OPSB ruled against a group of residents opposed to the project, stating they had “long ago missed a deadline to have a say in the process and instead relied on a separate group of opponents,” Union Neighbors United (UNU), to protect their interests. UNU reached a settlement with the developers last year. For more, read the full article

Renewable Energy, State Updates

Butler County looking at clean technology for public transportation

Officials in Butler County would like to bring hydrogen fuel cell or battery electric powered buses to the area to make local transportation cleaner and more sustainable, the Journal-News reports. The county needs to partner with a local agency or agencies to “fund the remainder of a vehicle’s price once federal grants are secured” to make that happen, according to the article. A diesel bus can cost $600,000, while a hydrogen fuel-cell bus is twice that at $1.2 million. Fuel cells “are considered safer than gasoline-powered vehicles and are two to three times more efficient,” reducing the amount of carbon emissions by 100 tons per vehicle. Butler County Regional Transit Authority Executive Director Matt Dutkevicz said battery electric or fuel-cell buses would be “a leap forward in local transportation in terms of reducing emissions and increasing sustainability.” For more, read the full article.

Energy Efficiency, Environmental

Renewable Hudson shining the light on solar for community

Cleveland-based solar installation company YellowLite joined with Renewable Hudson, an organization that promotes renewable energy in the city of Hudson, for a talk last month aimed to help community members better understand solar energy, MyTownNEO reports. The talk covered “how solar energy works,” why Ohio is in fact a good state for solar power, and how Hudson has already been supporting solar energy. Renewable Hudson conducted another talk recently at the Hudson Library, and YellowLite “frequently travels around the state to educate people on solar technology,” according to the article. Azam Kazmi, president of YellowLite, called Hudson “one of the strongest communities in Ohio for solar,” saying the city has a reputation for being progressive and business-friendly. For more, read the full article

Renewable Energy

AEP Ohio awards OU $250k to research solar’s economic benefits

AEP Ohio has awarded $250,000 in grants to Ohio University to conduct research on the economic benefits of renewable energy initiatives in southeastern Ohio, The Athens News reports. The Voinovich School of Leadership and Public Affairs at the university, which has a long-established relationship with AEP Ohio and the AEP Foundation, will conduct the research project. The study will focus on three main areas: “economic and workforce impacts of currently planned solar installations in Ohio, approaches to additional utility and non-utility solar deployment, and the grid reliability benefits of increasing solar energy penetration,” according to the article. The team will also look at the potential results of “future policy and program changes.” Gilbert Michaud, principal investigator on the project, said, “the increase in tax revenues and job creation associated with increased solar deployment will help create a more stable economy for the region.” For more, read the full article

Renewable Energy

Akron PNC Center begins $8.5M PACE-financed energy efficiency project

The 23-story PNC Center in downtown Akron has begun work on an $8.5-million energy-efficiency improvement project funded through property-assessed clean energy (PACE) financing, the Akron Beacon-Journal reports. A 25,000-pound aging chiller and two boilers will be removed and replaced with more efficient heating and cooling systems. The project also includes new lighting and other energy-efficient upgrades. The Development Finance Authority of Summit County (DFA) is issuing bonds to finance the project; those bonds will be repaid over 18 years at an average rate of about $477,000 annually. For more, read the full article.

Energy Efficiency, Project Finance

Can OSU’s carbon-capture technology help coal compete with renewables?

Coal-direct chemical looping (CDCL), a “promising technology under development at The Ohio State University,” can convert fossil fuels, including coal, into electricity without creating carbon dioxide pollution, Energy News Network reports. David Kraft, a fellow with power company Babcock & Wilcox, which is partnering with the university, said CDCL “has potential to transform the power and petrochemical industries,” according to the article. The technology involves metal oxide particles passing through high-pressure reactors to burn coal, biomass, or shale gas without the presence of oxygen. The CO2 is captured and can be used “for nanofibers or chemicals such as acetic acid or methanol.” Another outcome, synthesis gas, is “the technology’s likeliest near-term application, as it’s used as fuel in electricity-generating internal combustion engines” and the falling costs of renewable power generation make the economic viability of “clean coal” unclear. For more, read the full article

Environmental
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