Posts Authored by Zachary D. Eddy

Sirna and Sons solar installation generates 35% of company’s electric usage

Ravenna-based Sirna and Sons Produce has installed 1,331 solar panels on the roof of their Route 88 facility, enough to generate 35% of the electricity needed to power the 115,000 square feet of warehouse and office space, the Record-Courier reports. Tom Sirna, president of the fourth-generation wholesale food distributor, said the 30-percent federal tax credit lowered the payback period of the project from 10 to 12 years to 6 years. Without that, Sirna said, “the company probably wouldn’t have gone solar,” according to the article. The 452.5-kilowatt system “should cut carbon emissions by 650 tons every year,” which not only increases the company’s marketability, but aligns with Sirna’s goals to be more energy efficient and environmentally friendly. For more, read the full article.

Environmental, Financial Incentives, Renewable Energy, State Updates

Exelon files complaint and injunction motions against FirstEnergy Solutions in bankruptcy case

On November 26, 2018, Exelon Generation Company, LLC (Exelon) filed a complaint in U.S. bankruptcy court for the Northern District of Ohio for declaratory judgment and injunctive relief, along with a motion for preliminary injunction, against FirstEnergy Solutions (FES), to enforce a purchase agreement for the sale of FES' retail electric business to Exelon. Exelon, a Fortune 100 energy provider, alleges that FES is in material breach of the Asset Purchase Agreement (APA) “through its failure to use commercially reasonable efforts to obtain a Sale Order by November 6, 2018.” The alleged breach comes after Exelon was the only successful bidder, agreeing to buy bankrupt FES’ retail electric assets for $140 million in cash plus other consideration. Exelon has also asked the court to grant an emergency motion due to a fast approaching end-of-year deadline. 

Renewable Energy

Community leaders form Ohio Clean Energy Jobs Alliance to save Ohio’s nuclear plants

A “broad-based coalition of community leaders and organizations” have joined to form the Ohio Clean Energy Jobs Alliance, a group “seeking a public policy solution” that will allow the state’s two nuclear energy plants to remain in operation, The News-Herald reports. The coalition “will engage legislators, policymakers and the public to highlight the employment, economic, environmental and grid reliability benefits” provided by the Perry and Davis-Besse nuclear plants, the article reports. Lake County Commissioner Jerry Cirino said the plants contribute “over $500 million annually to the state’s economy — over 4,000 jobs are at stake.” Members of the alliance include the Perry Economic Development Council, members of the North Perry Village Council and the Mentor Council, the superintendent of Perry Local Schools and other community leaders. For more, read the full article.

Environmental, Renewable Energy, State Updates

Energy policy important for landing Amazon investment

Amazon’s head of energy policy, Jake Oster, “implored economic development leaders” at a Midwestern Governors Association conference “to put energy policy on par with other economic development considerations,” Columbus Business First reports. Oster urged government leaders “to think progressively if they’re trying to land one of [Amazon’s] massive facilities,” the article reports. Amazon’s Web Services segment is halfway to its commitment to power its data centers with 100 percent renewable energy. Oster said, “[a]t the end of the day, our priorities are sourcing reliable, cost-competitive clean energy, and we want policies that facilitate those outcomes. We want policymakers to use caution when using barriers that make it harder to develop clean energy.” For more, read the full article.

Economic Development, Renewable Energy, State Updates

Lake Erie wind turbine project “won’t harm environment,” DOE rules

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently ruled that the Lake Erie Energy Development Co. (LEEDCo)’s proposed project to build six wind turbines off the shore of Lake Erie “will have no significant impact on the environment,” Cleveland.com reports. The finding “included 14 categories of environmental impact,” including impact on the lake bottom as well as on birds, bats, fish and water quality. The ruling follows a two-year review and “means the federal agency’s funding arm can continue to support” the proposal to build the wind farm 8 to 10 miles offshore, according to the article. Six years ago, the DOE awarded LEEDCo a $50 million grant for the project, and has “so far dispensed $10 million of that award as the project developers met required milestones.” For more, read the full article.

Environmental, Federal Updates, Renewable Energy, State Updates

DP&L will invest up to $1 million for electric vehicle charging equipment

Beginning next year, Dayton Power & Light (DP&L) “will dedicate up to $1 million to building charging equipment for electric vehicles, according to an agreement the utility has with staff of the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO),” the Dayton Daily News reports. The capital investment will “fund distribution grid investments necessary to support installation of electric vehicle (EV) charging infrastructure in the DP&L service territory,” the article reports. Sharon Schroder, DP&L’s director of regulatory affairs, said the utility will “work with the Ohio EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) in charging station host applicants within its service territory to facilitate the installation of the fast chargers.” For more, read the full article.

Environmental, State Updates

Ohio Caverns first in U.S. to produce solar energy on site

When Ohio Caverns opened to the public in 1897, “visitors walked through with lanterns and candles”; now, the tourist attraction is “the first cave in the United States to have solar energy produced on site,” the Urbana Daily Citizen reports. Ohio Caverns installed a solar field that produces “44,000 watts at any given time when the sun is at its peak,” making it “energy neutral,” according to the article. Owner Eric Evans said the cave and facilities were completely retrofitted with LED lighting, which lowered energy consumption to the point “that solar became very viable.” Evans said, “we’ve been stewards of the environment since the cave first opened. . . . That’s where we see the future and longevity of the cavern is protecting and preserving the environment, and this was by far the cleanest form of energy known.” For more, read the full article

Energy Efficiency, Environmental, Renewable Energy

Ohio ranks 3rd in region for clean energy employment

More than 3,700 workers in the Mahoning Valley and 108,000 workers statewide are employed in the clean energy industry, a report from Clean Energy Trust and Environmental Enterprises finds, according to a recent article in The Business Journal. Those numbers placed the state third “in the 12-state region highlighted in the ‘Clean Jobs Midwest’ report.” Energy efficiency is the “top clean energy sector in the state,” employing 79,653; clean vehicles ranked second with “just over 14,000 employed,” according to the article. The study found “employers project 5.5% job growth in 2018.” Environmental Entrepreneurs spokesperson Micaela Preskill said in a release, “[w]ith further investment and smart state policy, clean jobs will continue [to] power Ohio’s economy into the next decade.” For more, read the full article, including a link to the full report.

Energy Efficiency, Environmental, State Updates

EDP Renewables secures two PPAs for Timber Road IV project

EDP Renewables North America LLC (EDPR) has secured “two 15-year power purchase agreements (PPAs) with an undisclosed commercial and industrial entity to sell the energy produced from its 125 MW Timber Road IV wind project,” nawindpower.com reports. Timber Road IV is expected to begin operations in 2019. For more, read the full article

Renewable Energy, State Updates

Ohio manufacturing could be revolution starting-point in advance energy technologies

Two analytical policy groups focused on “the impact of changing energy technologies on national defense” say Ohio’s manufacturing heritage “could be the starting point of a revolution in advanced-energy technologies,” Cleveland.com reports. CNA, a non-profit research and analysis organization “with roots in national defense analytical work,” and the Atlantic Council, “a think tank created in the early 1960s” in support of NATO, said the United States must embrace advanced-energy technologies or “the nation’s competitive manufacturing abilities and its military superiority will erode,” according to the article. David Livingston, the Atlantic Council’s deputy director for climate and advanced energy, said places like Cleveland that have a rich manufacturing heritage “have a role to play in the United States either being a leader or a laggard.” For more, read the full article.

Renewable Energy, State Updates
  • 1
  • 2