Posts Authored by Dylan F. Borchers

Laketran becomes member of Ohio Clean Energy Jobs Alliance

Public transit agency Laketran has joined the Ohio Clean Energy Jobs Alliance, a group “seeking a public policy solution that will allow the Perry Nuclear Power Plant to avoid its decommissioning (see our November 14, 2018 blog post),” The News-Herald reports. Laketran CEO Ben Capelle said, “[e]lectricity is the future energy source for all ground transportation, including buses,” noting that the federal government “is prioritizing electric bus infrastructure to reduce emissions and lower the cost of providing transit service,” according to the article. Fueling buses with nuclear-based power “allows the entire energy pipeline to be emissions-free.” Laketran, the “first transit system in the state to deploy zero-emissions electric vehicles,” plans to electrify its entire Local Route system. For more, read the full article

Environmental, Renewable Energy, State Updates

GreenGen to upgrade energy efficiency at three Ohio GSA facilities

An Energy Savings Performance Contract awarded to Green Generation (GreenGen) will help three Ohio General Services Administration (GSA) facilities reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, the Cincinnati Business Courier reports. GreenGen was “awarded a Task Order to design and install energy efficiency upgrades” including interior/exterior LED lighting and RTU and split system equipment replacement at the facilities, according to the article. The $1,059,000 contract “will be financed over a 12-year term,” and will “guarantee minimum first year savings of $83,623 and provide for $1.37 million in energy and cost savings for the US government during the contract term while improving the environment.” For more, read the full article

Energy Efficiency, Environmental, State Updates

Study shows wind and solar falling below conventional generation costs

Financial advisory and asset management firm Lazard Ltd.’s annual studies comparing costs of various generation technologies shows “in some scenarios, alternative energy costs have decreased to . . . at or below the marginal cost of conventional generation,” nawindpower.com reports. George Bilicic, vice chairman and global Head of Lazard’s Power, Energy & Infrastructure Group, said, “we have reached an inflection point where, in some cases, it is more cost-effective to build and operate new alternative energy projects than to maintain existing conventional generation plants,” the article reports. According to Bilicic, “storage remains the key to solving the problem of intermittency.” Lazard’s Levelized Cost of Storage Analysis “shows significant cost declines across most energy storage use cases and technologies.” For more, read the full article

Renewable Energy

Better energy polices could help bring $25B and 20K jobs to Ohio

New energy technologies “could lead to $25 billion” in investment and 20,000 new jobs for Ohio, according to a Powering Ohio report from Synapse Energy Economics and Case Western Reserve University’s Great Lakes Energy Institute, Columbus Business First reports. The report says “[t]he changing transportation industry could bring major jobs and investment to Ohio if the state has an energy policy in place to promote it,” according to the article. Recommendations include “nine points of policy improvement, including growing electric vehicles and clean energy workforce and attracting more manufacturing, enhancing the grid and smart transportation infrastructure.” The Smart Columbus program “has been a major leg up for this,” but a larger statewide strategy for energy policy “remains a key sticking point.” For more, read the full article.

Economic Development, Environmental, Smart Cities, State Updates

SARTA offers free loan of fuel-cell bus to any transit authority in the U.

The Stark Area Regional Transit Authority (SARTA) and the manufacturers of its fuel-cell buses have launched a national promotion “to persuade other transit authorities to switch to hydrogen fuel cells,” Cleveland.com reports. SARTA “is offering to loan” one of its 13 fuel-cell buses free of charge “to any transit authority in the nation interested in seeing first-hand how the now commercially available technology works,” according to the article. Kirt Conrad, SARTA’s CEO, said, “[g]iving the people across the country the opportunity to see, learn about, and ride on a hydrogen-fuel cell bus is the best way to demonstrate this technology’s potential to totally transform the way vehicles are powered here and around the world.” SARTA’s fuel cell buses have electric motors powered by on-board fuel cells that use oxygen from the air and stored hydrogen to generate power, emitting only water. For more, read the full article

Environmental, Renewable Energy

Vinton Solar Energy LLC gets approval for 125-MW solar farm

The Ohio Power Siting Board (OPSB) recently authorized Vinton Solar Energy LLC to construct the 125-megawatt Vinton Solar Facility in Vinton County, farmanddairy.com reports. The solar farm will be “located on approximately 1,950 acres of pasture land near McArthur, Ohio,” and “will transmit generated electricity to the power grid,” according to the article. For more, read the full article

Renewable Energy, State Updates

State certifies Seneca Wind as qualified energy project

The State of Ohio has certified the Seneca Wind project “as a qualified energy project, establishing a fixed payment in lieu of taxes” throughout its operational life, The Adviser-Tribune reports. Seneca Wind will “consist of up to 85 wind turbines on about 25,000 acres” in Scipio, Reed, Eden, Venice and Bloom townships, “providing energy to power almost 60,000 homes each year,” according to the article. The project’s proposed 212 megawatts of capacity over the expected 30-year lifespan of the project “would result in $56 million of revenue” from developer and owner sPower, “to be divided among schools, townships and Seneca County.” For more, read the full article

Renewable Energy, State Updates

Ohio kicks off interconnection rulemaking: Implications for distributed generation

The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) recently opened a docket to review Ohio Adm. Code Chapter 4901:1-22, which contains the rules for interconnecting distributed generation to the electric distribution system. The PUCO’s review of the interconnection rules comes shortly after the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) released updates and revisions to the IEEE 1547 standard regarding the requirements for interconnecting distributed energy resources (DERs) with the electric distribution system. It also comes shortly after the PUCO’s release of “PowerForward: A Roadmap to Ohio’s Electricity Future,” which sets forth certain policy positions and outlines principles and objectives for Ohio’s grid modernization efforts. 

On September 11, 2018, the PUCO held a stakeholder workshop to solicit feedback on potential revisions to the rules. For more, read the full publication.

Energy Efficiency, State Updates

Athens-based company named top solar provider in Ohio

Leading solar provider Third Sun Solar, based in Athens, Ohio, was ranked first in Ohio solar providers by Solar Power World’s 2018 Top 500 Solar Contractor’s List, The Athens News reports. Nationwide, Third Sun Solar was ranked 28th “among firms offering engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) services to commercial clients,” according to the article. Solar Power World developed the annual list “to recognize the work completed by solar contractors across the United States.” Rankings for the list were determined “by the number of kilowatts (DC) a company was involved with installing in 2017 in the United States only.” For more, read the full article.

Renewable Energy, State Updates

Ohioans saved more than $40B on energy over 10-year period, report says

Consumer Energy Alliance (CEA) says new technologies and increased production significantly reduced the price of natural gas and saved Ohio energy consumers $40.2 billion between 2006 and 2016, the News and Sentinel reports. CEA released a report, “The Benefits of Ohio’s Natural Gas Production to Energy Consumers and Job Creators,” that shows residential users “saved almost $15 billion, while commercial and industrial users saved upwards of $25.3 billion,” the article reports. The report shows that “[p]rior to the shale revolution, prices for natural gas in Ohio peaked at $10.66” but have “steadily decreased to just under $4.” Additionally, “[m]ore than 700 new businesses have been established statewide to support the shale industry, bringing in over $63.9 billion in new investments.” For more, read the full article.

State Updates
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10